Dating living

She never expected the image would be spread like wildfire. "Someone actually came to me and said 'You're Ally. A new study released this week finds more youths are using their tech gadgets and social media to abuse each other in romantic relationships.One in 10 teens reported they received a threatening cell phone message from their romantic partner, according to new results from the Cyberbullying Research Center, a research group dedicated to tracking bullying behaviors online among youth.Abusive teens may also exert their control by preventing their partners from using technology, experts say.About 10 percent of teens interviewed say a romantic partner stopped them from using a computer or cell phone.The abuse online and through cell phones can sometimes turn into physical violence, she warned.Since digital abuse does not leave physical marks on their children, parents may be clueless about the abuse."Tell somebody they trust and try to get help because you can't go through it yourself," she said.Dating is a stage of romantic relationships in humans whereby two people meet socially with the aim of each assessing the other's suitability as a prospective partner in an intimate relationship or marriage.

Her emotional pain was caused by her high school boyfriend, who blitzed her with cruel comments via instant messages, e-mails and My Space, calling her ugly and accusing her of cheating. Pereira, now 21, regrets sending her boyfriend the topless picture that was subsequently forwarded to other students in her high school. In the MTV documentary, Pereira's parents and friends also warned about the consequences of sexting photos like the one that caused Pereira such pain.

The 24/7 technology enables the abusive partner to stalk the other person after school and on weekends, he said.

Jennings said social networking, which can connect hundreds and thousands of students, gives the abusive partner more leverage.

With access to so many friends online, the abuser can post a damaging message online about their significant other or make threats to do so.

"It's the phenomenon of no place to run and no place to hide," Jennings says. You can't even see your predator coming." Jill Murray, a psychotherapist in California who has worked with victims of teen dating abuse, says almost all her new cases in the past three years involve technology.

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